A group of girls – there are seven or eight of them – all belong to the same church in a wealthy area of a North American city. They love to cook. They do not see why anyone in their city should be hungry. They cook with love.

By the time they are eight years old their pastor has let them take over the church kitchen. Each weekend and on evenings too they pour love into cakes and cookies. They give them to anyone who wants. People bring them ingredients. Word gets around. But although there is some publicity, mostly they avoid it.

In this city there is a mixture of wealth and poverty and some division between the races. Many of the rich have been hurting inside because of hidden guilt; many of the poor hurt from poverty and resentment too. These girls get to know more and more people within the city. They draw to them a larger group of children, boys as well as girls, several years younger than them and mostly from poorer parts of the city. First these new children help by taking food into their communities, but soon they are cooking too. Now they are cooking much more than the cakes they began with.

Everyone knows that the Recording Angel has a big book and a pen. Not so many know that the Angel has an eraser too. These girls believe that the love they put into the food they cook erases pain. The Recording Angel hovers over this city with a pocket full of spare erasers.

By the time they are eighteen these girls are ready to hand over to the younger ones. They will go off to college, to travel, to new work. More cities will know their love.